Servant Leadership Models

Servant Leadership Models

Much has been discussed about the need for law enforcement to move closer to servant leadership models. The professional literature, communication, and even public presentations focus on servant leadership as the next step in the evolution of criminal justice agencies. But what is it? Servant leadership first appeared in the 1970’s in the literature on organizational design and business and has most recently been explored in public service organizations. The concept itself is simple, compassion for those whom you lead and compassion for organizational service. Fairly well-intentioned concepts but hard to wrap your head around as a theoretical perspective for criminal justice leadership. We will explore some of the challenges and opportunities in implementing servant leadership as a theoretical approach to criminal justice. This week includes three articles which delve into the issue of servant leadership. Masal, 2015, extends the concepts of servant leadership to explore how shared leadership styles can transform police organizations. Kasner, 2017, discusses how changes in the political structure with the election of new mayor influences change among criminal justice agencies through the use of a servant leadership model. Finally, LePere-Schloop, 2016, will provide some recommendations on how criminal justice organizations can learn from mistakes made in top-down supervisory models. The assignment this week will allow you to articulate, in a PowerPoint presentation that highlights just what servant leadership is and how it can be used to change an organizations leadership models. Be sure to review this week’s resources carefully. You are expected to apply the information from these resources when you prepare your assignments. Resources Kasner, A. J. (2017). Local government design, mayoral leadership, and law enforcement reform. Stanford Law Review, 69(2), 549-602. http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=121508278&site=eds-live LePere-Schloop, M., & Lumpkin, J. H. (2016). Learning from Trayvon: Lessons and implications for police organizations and leaders. Journal of Public Management & Social Policy, 23(1), 61-73. http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edo&AN=116416209&site=eds-live Masal, D. (2015). Shared and transformational leadership in the police. Policing, 38(1), 40-55. http://proxy1.ncu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=psyh&AN=2015-39843-012&site=eds-live