Literary analysis of the “Harrison Bergeron

Literary analysis of the “Harrison Bergeron

Writer’s Choice Academic Level : Bachelor Paper details WRITING PROMPT: Create a 2-3 page, double-spaced rough draft of Short Essay 1, focusing on the literary analysis of the “Harrison Bergeron.” Make sure to upload your outline IN ADDITION to your rough draft. It is best to do this in one complete document. Rough Draft Requirements: • MLA format, including a works cited page • 2-3 double-spaced pages, exclusive of the works cited page Remember: 1. You are writing a literary analysis on “Harrison Bergeron,” which is going to be a close reading of the story. You need a thesis that makes an argument about the theme and the story.https://archive.org/stream/HarrisonBergeron/Harrison%20Bergeron_djvu.txt. 2. You can pick any theme that you would like from “Harrison Bergeron” to discuss in your analysis. Some options could be equality, conformity, and uniformity. 3. Use your outline as a guide for your paper. You must submit your outline with your paper in ONE document. 2. PS: I started the outline you can make the necessary correction as needed. Literary Analysis Outline Introductory Statement: Your chance to get the reader’s attention and display your awareness of the world around you. • In life everyone wants to be equal but sometimes this can prove not to be the ideal case. Transitional Ideas: Connect your opening idea to the text (two + sentences). • The reason being not everyone can handle the same task as the other person. • People are of different backgrounds. Identify Author and Title: As an additional transition sentence. • One story that perfectly fits this is the “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr Basic Background of Text: One to two sentences • Thesis Statement: Remember, this has to take a position about the text that can be supported by events in the text. • One of the themes of the story is equality can become dangerous if not controlled. Topic Sentence: Identifies focus of the paragraph; should clearly connect to / develop / support the thesis statement. • Preventing smart people from executing their ideas. Examples from the Text: This can take the form of two to three short examples or one extended example. Introduce Example: Example: Use quotations from the text or briefly paraphrase an event. Do not just summarize the plot. Avoid excessively long quotations unless absolutely necessary. Commentary: Follow example with explanation of its connection to the topic sentence/thesis. Repeat for each example/quotation used Closing Sentence: “Clincher” to end this paragraph and wrap-up the idea. Topic Sentence: Establish that you have reached the end of the essay, perhaps by echoing the idea of the thesis statement. Do not use trite expressions like “in conclusion” or “to sum up.” Reflect on Your Ideas: Make it clear to the reader why your paper was important. Stress what was unique about your interpretation. Give the reader something to think about that connects to the world around. Closing Statement: Wrap-up this discussion of your topic. Let the reader know the essay is at an end, and leave him or her with something to think about. This is the discussion that I did today: Hello Professor, In the short story Harrison Bergeron, one of the quote identified is “I’d think it would be real interesting, hearing all the different sounds,” which explains how each time the sound is transmitted to George’s ears his imagination drifts to what he think it is (Vonnegut Jr). I will be using this quote in my paper to highlight how George expresses himself after each transmittal. This shows one of the dangers of how uniformity prevents persons in the story from showing how smart they are. Another quote is “I don’t care if you are not equal to me for a while” (Vonnegut Jr). This shows that Hazel is not against George being different from her but only for a while. The paper will highlight how important inequality is to the characters in the story. Professor response: After you select your quotes, I really want you to think about why you picked those quotes. What made them stand out to you? Why are they important? And then in your paper, answer those questions. Explain the significance of every quote that you select. Analyze the quotes and explain how they support your thesis. Don’t assume the reader will follow your line of thinking and understand why the quote is important if it is in there without any explanation. We don’t want to make the reader do extra work. So it is important that you explain, analyze, and interpret the quotes. This will help your paper flow smoothly and will connect all of your evidence to your thesis.