Information Systems Acquisition

Information Systems Acquisition

LESSON 5.1
Information Systems Acquisition
REQUIRED READINGS
Wager, Lee, & Glaser Text:
Chapter 6: System Acquisition
Sample Project Charter, Appendix B: p. 483
Case Study €“ Acquiring an EMR System: p. 148

ADDITIONAL WEBSITE REFERENCES
Resource Index to Project Management Know-How

https://www.projectconnections.com/knowhow/index.html?gclid=CLS-25m5qo8CFQspFQodthJURg

Project Management

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
Lesson 5.1 Information System Acquisition
The Information system acquisition process begins with a request by senior management to determine if a new system is required, an existing one is in need of replacement, or a system needs to be updated. An evaluation of the need, critical success factors, and priority is made, where (hopefully) the system fits into the strategic plan and timeline of the organization. Upon approval of the need, a system vendor is selected, and then a contract is negotiated and signed. An outside consultant or internal staff may be used/selected to guide the acquisition process. (Wager 2009, pg 144).
Acquiring information technology can be an enormous investment in staff, hardware, software, and re-engineering. Besides the initial costs, there are a host of long-term costs associated with maintaining, supporting, and enhancing the application(s). All short-term and long time costs need to be identified in the acquisition of process. Too often IS applications are acquired without exploration of other options, without evaluating costs and benefits, and without gaining sufficient involvement from key constituent user groups €“ and the results can be disastrous. This discussion identifies the people who should be involved in the activities of acquisition, and the questions that should be addressed in acquiring an IS application. (Wager 2009, pg 144).
Your deliverable for this submission deals with eleven acquisition steps. Please note the number of steps may differ, BUT the overall content of an information systems acquisition process is here, whether expressed in more or less steps.
1. Your submission uses Exhibit 6.1 Overview of System Acquisition Process (Wager 2009 pg. 144) plus some additions by the instructor. Create a table similar to the below, and in size 10 font, place your discussion in its respective cell. If it is easier for you, you are welcome to do the table in Landscape mode. Each cell should contain two to three paragraphs.
Acquisition Steps What is the impact of this step in the long-term success and failure (if the step is not completed appropriately) of the total system? What role in this step, if any, do you see for yourself in your current/future career. Find a web reference for a real world example of this step. Summarize this example, and compare it to Wager and your own experience.
1. Establish project steering committee and appoint project manager (Priest comment: should an outside consultant guide this process?)
2. Define project objectives and scope of analysis
3. Screen market place and review vendor profiles
4. Determine System Goals
5. Determine and prioritize system requirements
6. Explore other options for acquiring system
?Application service provider
?Contact with system developer or build in-house
7. Develop and distribute a request for proposal (RFP) or request for information (RFI)
?Set format for vendor proposal response
?Develop vendor proposal evaluation criteria BEFORE final RFP to insure criteria within RFP
8. Evaluate Vendor Proposals
?Apply evaluation criteria
?Hold vendor demonstrations
?Make site visits and check references
?Prepare vendor analysis
9. Conduct cost-benefit analysis
10. Prepare summary report of vendor evaluation criteria and recommendations
11. Conduct contract negotiations

Information System Implementation, Support and Post-Implementation Audit

REQUIRED READINGS
Wager, Lee, & Glaser Text:
Chapter 7: System Implementation and Support
Sample Project Charter, Appendix B: p. 483
https://www.cio.com.au/index.php/id;1091307774 It Ain’t Over . . . Until You Do the Post-Implementation Audit

ADDITIONAL WEBSITE REFERENCES
CIO Magazine
Project Management Institute: Healthcare Specific Interest Group
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
Lesson 5.2 System Implementation, Support, and Post implementation audit (PDA)
1. Components of an Implementation and Support Plan

Lesson 5.2 recognizes the people and process who should be involved in the activities that should occur in implementing and supporting an IS application. (Wager 2009, pg 168). Moreover, it recognizes the value of the post-implementation audit (PIA) to determine the level of benefits (indeed, what is the return-on-investment (ROI)), lessons learned, and where do we go now system changes and updates.
System implementation, support and PIA refers to the processes after the decision to acquire the system is made. The reality is the long-term impact and success of a system is determined by the planning involved BEFORE the actual implementation. The post-implementation audit (PIA) verifies the success, failure, or and level of success expected in the system acquisition process.
Your task is comparing Wager’s typical components with actual case studies from those who have documented their experience. Create the below Typical Components of an Implementation Plan table. Using size 10 font, place your discussion in each component’s respective cell. Each cell should contain two to three paragraphs. If it is easier for you, you are welcome to do the table in landscape mode. Here is an explanation of the contents of the cells.
Typical Components of an Implementation Plan (Wager 2009 page 172 with refinements by instructor)
o Each listed component is a brief to stimulate your thoughts to understand its rationale. Each major component has more detail.
In two to three short paragraphs, discuss the impact of this component in the long-term success or failure of the total system. Your discussions should address answers to such questions as: Why is this component necessary? If this component is not addressed, or not addressed effectively, can this project still be successful? Who has oversight/approval for this component?

Your research should identify a committee(s) or senior manager(s) who should be involved. Who needs to know/approve the status of this component? In one to two paragraphs, what role, if any, do you see for yourself given your current/future vocation
o Each component of the implementation plan requires various staff involvement and oversight. The level of involvement depends on the component. For example, what do you see yourself doing in workflow and process analysis? What about system training? What about staff training? Should the IS Department or user department have sole responsibility for training a department, workflow analysis, testing, or PIA?

Find a web reference for a real world example of this component. In two to three paragraphs summarize this example, and compare it to Wager’s typical component. The instructor wants you to relate theory to a real world situation. Your research should find there are many ways for a component to be addressed. Through the varied experiences of others, you can best see how a component, or a hybrid of varied approaches, might be best for your organization. Be sure to name the web reference so your instructor can quickly go to it.

Typical Components of an Implementation and Support Plan Typical Components of an Implementation Plan (Wager 2009 page 172 with refinements by instructor) In two to three short paragraphs, discuss the impact of this component in the long-term success or failure of the total system.
Who has oversight/approval for this component?
In one to two paragraphs, what role, if any, do you see for yourself given your current/future vocation Find a web reference for a real world example of this component. In two to three paragraphs summarize this example, and compare it to Wager’s typical component.

1. Workflow and process analysis
a. Analyze or evaluate current processes and procedures
b. Identify opportunities for improvement and, as appropriate, effect those changes
c. Identify sources of data, including interfaces to other systems.
d. Determine location and number of workstations needed
e. Redesign physical location as needed.

2. System Installation
a. Determine system configuration
b. Order and Install hardware
c. Prepare computer room
d. Upgrade or implement IT infrastructure
e. Install software and interfaces
f. Customize software
g. Test, retest, and test again€¦

3. Staff training
a. Train Staff
b. Update online procedure manuals

4. Conversion
a. Convert data (none, all, partial)
b. Test system

5. Communications
a. Establish communication mechanisms for identifying and addressing problems and concerns
b. Communicate regularly with all constituent groups

6. Preparation for go-live
a. Select date when patient volume is relatively low
b. Ensure sufficient staff are on hand
c. Set up mechanism for reporting and correcting problems and issues
d. Review and effect process reengineering

7. On-going Support
a. Develop plan for end-user and IT support of the application.
b. Maintain on-going automated log for support activities (e.g. end-user issue, application up-time, etc.)
c. Develop periodic survey of user and IT satisfaction with application

8. Post Implementation
a. Three to six months after go-live
b. Use acquisition critical success factor to determine current status of these CSF
c. Being positive, identify what you did right, wrong, would do different next time, and how to communicate these in organization

:)

2. Learning Experience with Information Systems Implementation, Support, and Post-Implementation Audit

Address the three parts (Implementation, Support and Post-Implementation Audit) discussed here and tell what you learned from this exercise that you could apply in a real-world situation?
What question on each of the three parts still exists in your mind?

:)