geo101 2 peer discussion responses 200 words each

Please respond to both POST1: and POST2: in at least 200 words each. I have included the original post as a reference when answering the post:

Original Post:

River systems affect every living thing on this planet. Choose a river of your liking and report on it to the rest of us. You should include the stream’s origin, destination, type (braided or meandering), and any other interesting information that you might have uncovered. Share with us about how humans currently use this river, and what impacts that use has had on the river’s flow or its water quality. For instance, has it been dammed, diverted for irrigation, contaminated with pesticides, etc.? The Greek pre-Socratic philosopher Heraclitus remarked that “You cannot step in the same river twice.” Similarly, please do not choose a river that another student has already shared with the class.


POST1:

The five Great Lakes, Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario are a chain of deep freshwater lakes that border Canada and United States. These lakes are one of the Earth’s greatest features with a combined area of 94,250 square miles which is the world’s largest surface of fresh water, amounting to 18 percent of the world’s supply. The lakes connect to each other from Lake Superior into Lake Huron with an off shoot into Lake Michigan. Lake Huron empties into Lake Erie and continues into Lake Ontario eventually leading to the St. Lawrence River eastward to the Gulf of St. Lawrence into the Atlantic Ocean. My apologies for the geography lesson, let us backtrack to Lake Erie and a very well-known river, the Niagara River.

Lake Erie and Lake Ontario are connected by the meandering Niagara River which has an aggregate basin of 260,000 square miles. The Niagara flows in a northerly direction for approximately 35 miles and is a physical boundary between the United States and Canada. The river has an aggressive flow and steep gradient flow of 326 feet, making it one of the best sources of hydroelectric power in North America.

Both countries use the waters from the Niagara River for drinking, recreation, fishing, industrial, municipal effluents, and hydro-power generation. An interesting fact about the hydro-power generation is contained in a treaty between Canada and the U.S. dated 1950, referred to as the “1950 Niagara Treaty.” (Niagara Parks, 2020). The treaty regulates the flow over the Niagara Falls stating that it cannot be less than 2,832 cubic meters per second during April 1st to September 31st. In addition, the flow shall not fall below 1,416 cu m/s.

The river’s name originates from the Onguiaahra tribe. The French explorers gave the Indians the name “neutral” because of their disposition as peacekeepers between the Huron and the Iroquois tribes. The translation of the Indian name means Thunder of Waters. During the early years, the river was of great importance to the fur trade.

Of course, the Niagara River is home to one of the seven wonders of the world, Niagara Falls. Niagara Falls is a major tourist attraction on both sides of the border, with many daredevils having tried to barrel ride the falls or aerialists, such as the Flying Wallendas. In 2012, Nik Wallenda was the first man to complete an aerial walk across the falls.

On a personal note and not trying to be biased, the Canadian side of the falls is extremely breathtaking. It is a favorite among honeymooners, including my husband and I. We honeymooned there and have returned several times over the years, and a special weekend for our 25th.

Danger: Mr Wallenda was finely poised above the surging waterfall which has taken many casualties in the past

Nik Wallenda crossing Niagara Falls. (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/ (Links to an external site.))

Daily Mail. (2012, June 15). And he did look down!. Retrieved from https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2160143/Niagara-Falls-tightrope-walk-2012-Walker-Nik-Wallenda-person-cross.html (Links to an external site.)

Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. (2018, January 17). Niagara River. Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/place/Niagara-River (Links to an external site.)

Niagara Parks. (2020). Niagara Falls Geology: Facts and figures. Retrieved from https://www.niagaraparks.com/visit-niagara-parks/p…

POST2:

The Trinity River

The Trinity River in Dallas, Texas and surrounding areas is a meandering river. This river runs 710 miles and is considered the largest river in the area. Its name came about in 1690, by Alonso de Leon, and explorer that led expeditions from Mexico and South Texas. Alonso de Leon called the Trinity River La Santisima Trinidad, which means the most Holy Trinity.

Trinity River rises into 3 branches: East fork, Elm fork, County which flows 78 miles south. The East fork runs through Collin, Rockwall, Dallas, and Kaufman Counties were it meets the West fork in the Southwestern part of Kaufman County. The Wlm fork rises through Montaque County and runs southeast 85 miles through Cooke and Denton counties. The West fork rises in ArcherCounty and moves southeast 180 miles through Jack, Wise, Tarrant counties. The Clear fork of the Trinity runs through Parker northwest 45 miles until it joins the West fork along with cental Tarrant county near Ft. Worth. The Trinity River is the longest river that runs throughout Texas. The most disastrous flood on record was in 1908, there were much damaged reported, and reservoirs have been put into place to control flooding in many other areas.

During the Colonial Period of Texas, settlers used the Trinity River to bring supplies, dry goods to the early settlers. Cotton, sugar, and other goods that were produced in Dallas, and surrounding areas used the Trinity to transport their goods to other areas. Also during this time, there were slaughterhouses along the banks of the Trinity River, and with the rapid population in Dallas, the river has a history of quality water challenges. I live in Kaufman county, and when I drive by the Trinity River, I can smell sewage but people are fishing down those banks every chance they get.

Sources

Trinity River Authority of Texas. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.trinityra.org/ourhistory (Links to an external site.)

Handbook of Texas Online, Wayne Gard, “TRINITY RIVER,” accessed January 07, 2020, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/rnt02.