Communication Marketing and Public Relations

Communication Marketing and Public Relations 

Part I: Public Health Campaign (3 pages) • Briefly describe the public health issue you selected and justify your selection • Identify the audience you wish to target • • MY PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE IS JUVENILE DIABETES • • Justify the target audience you selected • Briefly describe and justify the theory in which you will use to support your campaign • Explain the initial methods you plan to use to create your public health campaign and explain why you selected those methods • Briefly describe your goals for implementing a public health campaign (creating social change, changing behavior, increasing awareness, etc.) Please see most recent assignment. This may help in the above proves Communications Marketing and Public Relations Juvenile diabetes, also known as type 1 is a significant public health concern. This is a lifestyle condition that emanates from the underproduction of insulin by the pancreas, or the lack of its production at all, causing the level of blood sugar to be unmonitored. Medically, juvenile diabetes is incurable, but various interventions have been formulated to manage it. To understand the different parameters that define this disorder, several health theories have been formulated. Among these theories include the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and the Trans-theoretical Stages of Change. It is thus crucial to examine these theories, highlight their strengths, as well as their weaknesses, and evaluate their clinical application more so regarding juvenile diabetes. Theory of Reasoned Action and the Theory of Planned Behavior It is postulated by any action, whether healthy or unhealthy by individuals highly dictate the conditions they are in. The theory of reasoned action thus explains this by asserting that the attitudes that individuals had towards acting significantly influenced their behavior. Fishbein and Ajzen formulated this theory in 1975 (Trafimow, 2009). Therefore, the perception and attitudes that individuals hold towards specific actions are cited as the determinants for their behaviors. This theory could be utilized to explain the various lifestyle choices made by individuals that determine their risk of having type 1 diabetes. The theory of planned behavior, on the other hand, is an extension of the theory of reasoned action, and it asserts to the intentions that an individual has as the factor that dictates their course of action and thus their behavior. This theory, therefore, is vastly utilized to explain the voluntary control that individuals had in pursuing the various actions and assuming the multiple behaviors they did. The intentions are thus the proximal determinants of behavior, with the attitude as the precursor of the intentions. Other determinants include social norms, perceived power, and the perceived behavioral control by the individual. The efficacy of this theory has been estimated to account for 14 to 24% of the between-study variations in patient behaviors (McDermott et al. 2015). The theory can be employed in determining the intentions of people in eating healthy balanced diet meals in correlation to the avoidance of diabetes among other lifestyle disorders. As two of the most fundamental theories, the theory of reasoned action and planned behavior offer a crucial tool for medical and clinical application. However, they also have a limitation. The method of reasoned behavior, for instance, has been criticized as being non-falsifiable. It also assumes that there are possibly no limitations once a person intends to act. The theory of planned behavior also has limitation. First, it takes the assumption that every individual has the resources that would enable them to pursue an action successfully despite their intention. It secondly fails to address the time frame between the intention to act, and the behavioral action. The Health Belief Model Theory Communication is, no doubt, a critical tool in the administration of any medical intervention. The health belief model thus posits that behavior is determined by six fundamental factors among them the risk severity, self-efficacy, risk susceptibility, benefits if actions, cues to actions, and the barriers to action. Therefore, communication can attain its maximum efficacy in behavior change once the messages target the benefits, threats, self-efficacy, and perceived barriers (Jones et al., 2015). This model postulates that populations and communities often tend to take action towards the eradication or prevention of a disease once they perceive that they are at risk. Therefore, any clinical campaign aimed at sensitizing people of juvenile diabetes must first establish the disorder as a threat to the community. Self-efficacy is considered a crucial tool to address illnesses, even with the presence of considered barriers. The health belief model has several advantages. It first recognizes the cognitive aspect of healthcare and thus addresses motivation and self-efficacy as crucial factors. It also offers a more holistic way of looking at the health beliefs of patients (Glanz & Bishop, 2010). On the other hand, it also exhibits disadvantages such as its lack of addressing some relevant factors, including the accessibility of healthcare facilities to people. It similarly fails to address the various diversified groups of patients such as those with menta